Sunday, July 08, 2007

What Are You Eating ? Books About Food

Although I'm sure you remember the hoopla about Michael Pollen's Omnivore's Dilemma in 2006, if you have not yet picked it up to read, I seriously suggest that you do. If you are interested in finding out about American Industrial Agriculture, Industrial Organic, the reason that cows should not be fed corn, and the way to make your food selection not only a sustainable act, but a political act--then you must read this book.

Although I'm sure you remember the hoopla about Michael Pollen's Omnivore's Dilemma in 2006, if you have not yet picked it up to read, I seriously suggest that you do. If you are interested in finding out about American Industrial Agriculture, Industrial Organic, the reason that cows should not be fed corn, and the way to make your food selection not only a sustainable act, but a political act--then you must read this book.

Micheal Pollen has taken detailed information about the food we eat, how it is grown or raised, how it is processed, how it gets to our hungry mouths, and the mark that its production leaves on the environment.

I finally had the chance to read this exquisite book during the last month, and found it increasingly difficult to put down, even though I am living with almost 24 hours of daylight and numerous outdoor activities to take the place of reading.

Not only is the book brimming with fascinating and useful information, but Pollen discusses and quotes various other fantastic less well-known (at least to me) writers who have written on the subject of farming.

This book has re-inspired me, it has reminded me of the values I hold in food, in treating the earth, and in treating animals. I have started a list of the things I want to do, things I have only thought about for brief moments during the past several years. I am now calling myself to action, and have finally decided that yes, what I eat is more than carbs fat and protein, it is a political statement, it is my decision not only to nourish myself and to respect the earth, but to adamantly oppose industrial agriculture. Local is the only sustainable choice--everything else has costs. I am also hell-bent on getting rid of my affinity for soda.

Other books of interest, that I haven't yet read but are sitting on my shelf:

And . . .

And . . .

3 comments:

Renegade Eye said...

At the universities, the food science departments are in the hands of Cargill, Pillsbury, General Mills etc. You can't get good grades unless you tow the company line.

The problem the organic movement has is cost. The coop in my neighborhood is quite expensive.

You're still in Alaska? The rightist blogger Roman from at my link list Roman's Musings has pix from Alaska. He is conservative, and friendly to my blog.

ella said...

I am still in AK.
I agree that organic food, and even locally grown organic food can be more expensive. But, we pay more for fancy clothes, fancy cars, and other things "of high quality." What we put in our bodies should be even more important than what we ride around in or clothe ourselves in. The cost also is misunderstood b/c organic foods have so many fewer environmental costs (that we end up paying for in other ways). Cheap industrial food COSTS but it just doesn't show up at the grocery store, it show up in other places.

Adam said...

Agreed. When we buy local we are paying the un-subsidized "true" cost of food. Buying from Safeway or Kroger or Wal-Mart means cheaper products that are heavily subsidized by the govt. but shipped all over the place, coated in wax, etc... a danger to our environment and our health. Eating locally is the way that nature intended--consuming only what is in-season and can be reasonably produced within the vicinity. A smart choice indeed.